The struggle against the Cruise missile base in Comiso 1981–83

Comiso in Sicily became a prime place on the NATO nuclear armaments map, having been chosen to house 112 cruise missiles. A prosperous commercial and agricultural centre, it is characterised by poverty and unemployment, a situation that prevails among Sicilian peasants and manual workers. In contrast to what was being said by the Italian government — that the missile base would bring wellbeing and jobs to the area — some local anarchists (comrades in Ragusa and Catania) decided to give a more realistic picture based on the social and economic effects that such a base would have, along with the organisational proposal to form self-managed leagues in all the area, which would coordinate to occupy and destroy the base.

Alfredo M. Bonanno
Revolutionary Struggle and Insurrection

Our task as anarchists, our main preoccupation and greatest desire, is to see the social revolution come about: a terrible upheaval of men and institutions which finally succeeds in putting an end to exploitation and establishing the reign of justice.

Max Stirner
The False Principle of Our Education Or — Humanism And Realism

Written as a reaction to Otto Friedrich Theodor Heinsius’ treatise Humanism vs. Realism, Stirner explains that education in either the classical humanist method or the practical realist method still lacks true value. Education, therefore, is fulfilled in aiding the individual in becoming an individual.

Filippo Argenti
Nights of Rage On the recent revolts in France

This booklet is a modest contribution to understanding the recent revolts in France. Needless to say, it is not sociological or, in a nobler sense, theoretical insight. Revolts can only be understood by those who have the same needs as the rebels, that is to say by those who feel they are part of the revolt. After a brief chronology, in fact, the pages that follow pose the question of how the events of November in France concern all of us, and also try to give a possible answer.

‘Caso Bombas’ Chile 2010

CHILE RECENTLY DOMINATED WORLD HEADLINES through the much publicised rescue of 33 miners entombed in the Atacama desert after the dilapidated, unstable mine they were working in collapsed. When the ‘accident’ took place on 5 August, there seemed little hope of saving their lives.
9 DAYS LATER, on August 14, public prosecutor Ricardo Peña gave the order to set in motion “Operation Salamandra”, in which agents of the BIPE (Investigation Police) the ERTA , the GOPE (Special Forces of the Normal Police), LABOCAR (CSI) and a series of helicopters and police cars were used to carry out 17 spectacular dawn raids in Santiago and Valparaiso.

The Unwanted Children of Capital

What is a CPT (the Italian for immigration detention centre)? It is a place where the Italian State locks up all immigrants (children, women and men) who do not have stay permits. It is a modern concentration camp where undesirables are confined before being deported.
Immigration detention centres exist all over fortress Europe, as the bosses establish that only certain immigrants are allowed to stay; the others, those whose face doesn’t fit and cannot be exploited as cheap labour, are locked up in prisons especially created for them and held until they are deported. They are ‘guilty’ of coming from lands where mere surviving is impossible, owing to famine and war, desertification and ecological disasters, industrial reorganisation and mass dismissal.

Errico Malatesta
Anarchists have forgotten their principles

At the risk of passing as a simpleton, I confess that I would never have believed it possible that Socialists—even Social Democrats—would applaud and voluntarily take part, either on the side of the Germans or on the Allies, in a war like the one that is at present devastating Europe. But what is there to say when the same is done by Anarchists—not numerous, it is true, but having amongst them comrades whom we love and respect most?

Alfredo M. Bonanno
Towards insurrection

To launch a struggle against a precise aspect of power that is oppressing us, against a repressive structure under construction like the maxi-prison, is to pose the question of destruction. Because that’s the only way to put a final end to the structure in question. To believe that an enormous project such as the maxi-prison can be prevented by the gentle voice of petitions and legalist opposition is not only to deceive oneself but also everyone else, all the oppressed and excluded. No, such a struggle must pose the question of insurrection: stopping the progression of power by force and self-organisation. But how pose this question? With the aid of attempts if not similar, at least moved by a similar will in the past, comrade Alfredo M. Bonanno will throw some light on this crucial question.

Peter Kropotkin
The Great French Revolution 1789–1793

Kropotkin’s work on the French Revolution is without doubt one of the fundamental interpretations of events that were to transform the destiny of humanity. Its importance lies in two premises: the design of a revolutionary development that is different and more significant than that usually suggested by bourgeois historians, and the individuation of the first symptoms of the current of thought and action which, a century later, was to take the name of anarchism.

Max Sartin, Wolfi Landstreicher, Dominique Misein, Adonide
This is What Democracy Looks Like

One would think that a political doctrine and system that was propagated by the bourgeoisie in their rise to power, that is promoted world-wide by the Western ruling class and that has only existed in its so-called “pure” form on the backs of slaves, would at least be suspect in the eyes of those who oppose the present social order. But such is not the case.